Citizenship (Bipatride & Apatride)

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Citizenship (Bipatride & Apatride)


The relationship between the state and the person can move a domicile in another country. If seseosang or family who reside in another country gave birth to a child, then the child's citizenship status depends on principles that apply in the country where applicable in the country of his birth and his parents. The difference principle embraced by other countries, such as country A-adheres to the principle of ius sanguinis, while country B follows the principle of ius-soli, it may cause Bipatride or Apatride status in children of parents who migrate between the two countries.

Bipatride (bi-state) arise if, according to the regulations of the two countries concerned person is considered as a citizen of both countries. For example, Adi and Ani is conjugal status A namum their citizens live in country B. Country A-adheres to the principle of ius sanguinis and country B follows the principle of ius-soli. Then their son was born, Dani. According to state that adheres A-ius sanguinis principle, Dani is the citizens because it follows the citizenship of his parents. According to country B which adheres to the principle of ius-soli, Dani also citizens, because the place of birth is the country B. Thus Dani had two citizenship status or Bipatride.

While Apatride (stateless) arise if, according to the rules of citizenship, a person is not recognized as citizens of any country. For example Agus and Ira are conjugal status-ius soli. They live in the berasas negasa A-ius sanguinis. Then their son was born, Budi. According to the state A, Budi was not recognized as citizens, as parents are not warganegasa. Similarly, according to state B, Budi was not recognized as citizens, having been born in another country. By demilian Budi does not have citizenship or Apatride.


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